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Texas CISPA Bill Scheduled for Monday Vote


by: Ben Sherman

Sun May 19, 2013 at 02:00 PM CDT


Read more about the contents of the bill here.

The Texas CISPA bill, approved unanimously by the House last week, may be passed by the Legislature within 24 hours. It has been scheduled for a vote on Monday.

The bill, now slightly altered SB 1052 in the Senate, does the following:

  • Requires any Internet provider that serves Texans to hand over private communication and files.
  • Sets no standard for warrants for such seizures, enabling arbitrary violations of Texans' privacy.
  • Forces Internet providers to respond within 15-30 days (and sometimes 4-30), giving them almost no time to protect information not targeted.
  • Makes it a crime for an officer, director or owner of a company to not comply with the request within the 15-30 day window.
  • Opens the door to politically-motivated seizures of online communication.

Read more below the jump.

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This bill is a sneaky way to pass CISPA legislation. Don't be tricked: since just about every major tech company does business in Texas, this bill will have national consequences.

Our entire online privacy is at stake tomorrow and we need to speak up. Call the offices of our state senators and tell them to oppose this insane law.



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No no. (3.00 / 1)
CISPA and SB 1052 have nothing in common.  Texas bills aren't that long, and I feel like it only takes a cursory reading to debunk the 4 of the 5 points above.  

Requires any Internet provider that serves Texans to hand over private communication and files.
- Sure.  If there's a lawfully obtained warrant.  Why was that left out of your statement?  Is it because it sounds less scary and exciting?

Sets no standard for warrants for such seizures, enabling arbitrary violations of Texans' privacy.
-   This is the opposite of truth.  All warrants in Texas require a burden of proof that is defined in other, existing, well-established laws.  This bill would require a warrant for the seizure of electronic records.  None was required before.  Is it not better that now, in order to seize electronic records a warrant would be required?  A warrant has to be obtained from a judge and presents a way for potential defendants to appropriately respond to any potential evidence collected.  

Forces Internet providers to respond within 15-30 days (and sometimes 4-30), giving them almost no time to protect information not targeted.
- Yes.  The time limit is ridiculous for electronic records and might cause undue trouble to the organization or person served.  Thank goodness the billion dollar industries that would be served these warrants have sufficient legal recourse to correct this issue if SB1052 is passed and and signed by our horrible governor.

Makes it a crime for an officer, director or owner of a company to not comply with the request within the 15-30 day window.
- Yep.  Like all warrants and court orders, one has to comply||contest or one gets in trubs with the man.

Opens the door to politically-motivated seizures of online communication.
- Of course it doesn't; unless you believe that obtaining a warrant for spurious and illegal reasons is something that is easy to do in Texas or goes unnoticed when/if it happens.  We Texans don't live in a never-ending John Grisham novel of shadowy intrigue and illegitimate legal processes.

I'll mention in passing that HR3523 defined how the federal government can use information voluntarily shared by ISPs.  There's not a single mention of warrants in HR3523.

I understood why everyone read the devil into the many versions of CISPA.  Federal bills are long and the bulk of  HR3523's 18 pages outlined federal accountability for information obtained which makes for boring dystopian fiction.  SB1052 is just two or three pages long with the new addenda and reads plainly.  

Either you didn't read it, you have rather poor reading comprehension, or you're blatantly lying about SB1052's contents in order to entice and titillate with the hope that no one will actually read the bill but will visit your site.

I found BOR because someone posted a link to this story, urging me to call my district's senator to ensure that this bill dies on the floor.  I'm guessing they read your 5 point "summary", assumed for whatever reason you were being honest, and summarily gasped and shared away. I followed the shared link and spent about 30 minutes on the site.  You got  at least 3 good ad impressions.  Good job; but blatant misreads and lying to get you a couple of bucks in ad revenue doesn't make you a journalist.  It just makes you another G. Beck.


yes yes (0.00 / 0)
I created a new account just so that I could tell you, howdandy, that you are my new favorite person on the internet. Your reply is brilliantly hilarious and critical without being rude.  Bravo.

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